Kokopelli Pony
#1508 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Joel Nakamura

A sacred figure to Native tribes in the Southwest, the image of Kokopelli, a dancing hunchback playing a flute, appears most frequently in pottery and petroglyphs. A universal minstrel or music spirit who continues to fascinate people, even in our modern technological age, he is given a charming, contemporary interpretation by Joel Nakamura, an Asian-American artist known for his deep knowledge of tribal art and mythology.

Skyrider
#1509 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Wendy Wells-Bailey

The Hopi believe that when their elders pass on they continue to exist among the clouds, where they protectively watch over their descendants. Wendy, a graduate of the London School of Fine Art who feels her spirit dwells in the deserts, mesas and canyons of the Southwest, has taken this belief to new heights, literally, imagining a Pony stampeding across the sky on a glorious journey, collecting the faces of the ancestors and becoming one with the Cloud People.

Willing
#1510 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Virgil Ortiz

Often referred to as one of the most imaginative and compelling ceramists of his generation, Virgil lives and works at the Cochiti Pueblo. He is known as much for taking traditional art forms in cutting-edge directions, as collaborative clothing ventures with New York fashion designer Donna Karan. Tattooed with traditional pottery designs before it was strapped down in black leather and silver spikes, this dramatic re-interpretation of Black Beauty has a mystique, a sensuality and a power that is vintage Virgil Ortiz.

Seguaro Stallion
#1523 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: John Geryak

A former Creative Director with a New York marketing agency, John has enjoyed a successful second career in the arts after moving to Scottsdale, Arizona, where his paintings focus on highly personalized, contemporary interpretations of Nature. His extraordinary rendering of the wondrous effects of a moonrise and sunrise on a stand of saguaro cactus captures John’s goal as a painter, which is "to offer new dimensions in how we see our one-of-a-kind desert landscape."


 

 
Incognito
#1524 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Janee Hughes

Writes Janee Hughes, a former art teacher and book illustrator from Salem, Oregon, "Biologists are not in agreement about the purpose of a zebra's stripes. Some say the wonderful patterns act as camouflage in the tall grass, but others say the stripes confuse predators. When a lion sees a herd of zebras, it is difficult for her to distinguish one animal from another in order to single out a potential victim. Whichever the case may be, it was great fun creating a herd of Grant’s zebras living 'Incognito.'"

Caballito
#1525 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Amado Pena

Monument Valley, Spider Rock and Enchanted Mesa are names that evoke an aura of mystery and legends. Storied sites in the American Southwest, they also shape the dramatic backgrounds for the culturally rich imagery found in the paintings of Mexican/Yaqui artist Amado Pena. Using bold color, striking forms, dynamic composition, and the iconic faces that have distinguished his work for years, Pena has created, with his Pony, a tribute to the horses he has known, past and present.

Epic Horse
#1526 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Jeffrey Chan

Stone tablets have played an important role in the heritage of Chinese culture. Knowing this, Jeffrey Chan, an art designer for Hong Kong movies who also specializes in giftware design, conceived of a glossy black Pony on which a famous poem was carved in a manner that captured the beauty of the art of Chinese calligraphy. The poem, "Orchid Pavilion Preface," was written in 352 A.D. by Wang Xizhi, one of the most highly respected calligraphers and poets in Chinese history. It is a masterpiece that speaks to the happiness and grace of every living moment.

Cowpony
#1584 - Resin.
Herd #5 - January, 2005.
Artist: Lori Musil

With millions of brushstrokes masterfully applied, Lori, a western and wildlife artist from Cerrillos, New Mexico, created an original, life-size Painted Pony that is proudly exhibited in the Booth Western Art Museum. By popular demand, it is now available as a figurine, and as a miniature retains the phenomenal creative power of the original. Sculpted into the Pony form as well as painted, a herd of Hereford cows emerge from the swelling muscles of the horse… and hidden among the red-and-whites, a savvy sorrel cowpony.